DaedTech

Stories about Software

By

Who Accepts Your Team’s Academy Awards?

I was listening to the Smart Passive Income podcast the other night. Yeah, I wasn’t kidding. I’m really trying to figure out how to do this stuff. Anyway, it was an episode with “User Stories” in the title, so I was intrigued. What I actually thought to myself was, “I’m a lot more inclined to hear stories about passive income than about Scrum, but this could be interesting!” And, it actually was interesting. I mean that earnestly. The episode was about Pat commissioning an IOS app for his podcast, so anyone making a living in our industry would be somewhat intrigued.

The episode started, and I listened. Admittedly, beyond Pat, I don’t exactly know who the players are, but I can tell you what I inferred as I was jogging (I frequently listen to podcasts when I jog). The interview started, and Pat was talking to someone that seemed to have a project-manager-y role. Pat asked about the app, and the guest talked about communication, interactions, and the concepts of “user story” and “product backlog.” He didn’t actually label this process Scrum until much, much later in the interview, and I get that – he’s talking to a huge audience of potential clients, so it’s a lot more compelling to describe Scrum as if it were something he thought of than it is to say, “oh yeah, we do Scrum – go google it!”

LeaderSpeaker

I don’t begrudge him that in the slightest. It’s a savvy approach. But it did strike me as interesting that this conversation about an app started with and centered around communication and planning. The technical decisions, data, and general nuts and bolts were all saved for later, delegated to a programmer underling, and framed as details that were definitely less relevant. In the development of this app, the important thing was the project manager, who he talked to, and when he talked to them. The development of the app was a distant second.

My reaction to this, as I jogged, was sad familiarity. I didn’t think, “how dare that project manager steal the show!” I thought, “oh, naturally, that’s a project manager stealing the show – that’s more or less their job. Developer code, not know talk human. Project manager harness, make use developer, real brains operation!”

Read More

By

It’s a Large Batch Life for Us

It’s a large batch life for us!
‘stead of feedback we just wait!
‘stead of options we trust fate!

— Little Orphan Annie…sort of.

Before I talk about “large batch life,” I’d like to take a moment to share with you a bemused chuckle at really poorly done verbal tribalism.  Rather than try to explain in the general sense, I’ll offer an example: an out of touch father trying to determine if his kids are doing drugs by saying, “so, dudes, are any of your friend-bros on the pot?”  He’s attempting (and failing) to crack their linguistic code to gain credibility. The kids, presumably, have a tribe with its own invisible speakeasy, and Dad is trying to get in.

There are tons of tribes, and you’re a member of many.  When you say, “pull request,” in casual conversation, you’re indicating that you’re part of the tribe that puts open source code on Github.  When you tell people to “put it on my calendar,” you’re indicating that you’re part of office culture. There’s nothing particularly notable or bemusing about that — it’s simply the mechanics of human communication.  Where things start to get awkward is when Dad enters the mix in the form of a recruiter or hard-charging project manager and wants to establish cred in that world without really having any: “Hey dudebros, can I pull request a phone interview with you?”

RetirementAnnie

Read More

By

What Is a Best Practice in Software Development?

(Editorial Note: Hello, Code Project, folks and thanks for stopping by! I’m really excited about the buzz around this post, but an unintended consequence of the sudden popularity is that so many people have signed up that I’ve run out of Pluralsight trial cards. Please still feel free to sign up for the mailing list, but understand that it may be a week or so before I can get you a signup code for the 30 day trial. I will definitely send it out to you, though, when I get more. If you’d like to sign up for a 10 day trial, here is a link to the signup that’s also under my courses on the right.)

A while ago, I released a course on Pluralsight entitled, “Making the Business Case for Best Practices.”  (If you want to check it out, but don’t have a Pluralsight account, sign up for my mailing list in the side bar to the right and I’ll send you a free 30 day subscription).  There was an element of tongue-in-cheek to the title, which might not necessarily have been the best idea in a medium where my profitability is tied to maximizing the attractiveness of the title.  But, life is more fun if you’re smiling.

Anyway, the reason it was a bit tongue in cheek is that I find the term “best practice” to be spurious in many contexts.  At best, it’s vague, subjective, and highly context dependent.  The aim of the course was, essentially, to say, “hey, if you think that your team should be adopting practice X, you’d better figure out how to make a dollars and cents case for it to management — ‘best’ practices are the ones that are profitable.”  So, I thought I’d offer up a transcript from the introductory module of the course, in which I go into more detail about this term.  The first module, in fact, is called “What is a ‘Best Practice’ Anyway?”

Best Practice: The Ideal, Real and Cynical

The first definition that I’ll offer for “best practice” is what one might describe as the “official” version, but I’ll refer to it as the “ideal version.”  Wikipedia defines it as, “method or technique that has consistently shown results superior to those achieved with other means, and that is used as a benchmark.”  In other words, a “best practice” is a practice that has been somehow empirically proven to be the best.  As an example, if there were three possible ways to prepare chicken: serve it raw, serve it rare, and serve it fully cooked, fully cooked would emerge as a best practice as measured by the number of incidents of death and illness.  The reason that I call this definition “ideal” is that it implies that there is clearly a single best way to do something, and real life is rarely that neat.  Take the chicken example.  Cooked is better than undercooked, but there is no shortage of ways to fully cook a chicken – you can grill it, broil it, bake it, fry it, etc.  Is one of these somehow empirically “best” or does it become a matter of preference and opinion?

Barbecue

Read More

By

The Tech Lead Role: Lessons from Ancient Rome

 

Julius Caesar, Mark Antony, and Cassius walk into a bar, and the bartender asks them what they’ll have. “3 beers!” Caesar proclaims. “2 beers,” whispers Cassius.

 

Because I’m not a historian, I have the luxury of making spurious historical arguments that suit my purpose. I can even bring in Star Wars if I want to. For those of you only passingly familiar with the story of Caesar, he was the pivotal, popular, and controversial figure around which the Roman Republic became the Roman Empire. He was also the obvious inspiration for the scene in which Chancellor Palpatine becomes Emperor Palpatine, causing Padme to remark, “so this is how liberty dies… with thunderous applause.” Caesar was a popular and extraordinary general that imposed his will on the increasingly ineffectual Roman Republic, essentially replacing it with a more unified and centralized imperial government. That is, until his friends in the bar assassinated him in the name of “liberty.”

Caligula Read More

By

Performance Reviews Simplified

If you were to ask people in the corporate world about the most significant moments of their careers, a lot of them would probably talk about annual performance reviews. That’s a curious thing. Anyone who talks about performance reviews when asked this question is not talking about an idea they had that saved the company hundreds of thousands of dollars or about rescuing a project that had gone sideways. Instead, their careers were defined sitting in a room with their managers, going through a worksheet that purports to address how well they’ve matched up against the company’s ‘values.’

FriendlyBoss

Read More