DaedTech

Stories about Software

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Who Accepts Your Team’s Academy Awards?

I was listening to the Smart Passive Income podcast the other night. Yeah, I wasn’t kidding. I’m really trying to figure out how to do this stuff. Anyway, it was an episode with “User Stories” in the title, so I was intrigued. What I actually thought to myself was, “I’m a lot more inclined to hear stories about passive income than about Scrum, but this could be interesting!” And, it actually was interesting. I mean that earnestly. The episode was about Pat commissioning an IOS app for his podcast, so anyone making a living in our industry would be somewhat intrigued.

The episode started, and I listened. Admittedly, beyond Pat, I don’t exactly know who the players are, but I can tell you what I inferred as I was jogging (I frequently listen to podcasts when I jog). The interview started, and Pat was talking to someone that seemed to have a project-manager-y role. Pat asked about the app, and the guest talked about communication, interactions, and the concepts of “user story” and “product backlog.” He didn’t actually label this process Scrum until much, much later in the interview, and I get that – he’s talking to a huge audience of potential clients, so it’s a lot more compelling to describe Scrum as if it were something he thought of than it is to say, “oh yeah, we do Scrum – go google it!”

LeaderSpeaker

I don’t begrudge him that in the slightest. It’s a savvy approach. But it did strike me as interesting that this conversation about an app started with and centered around communication and planning. The technical decisions, data, and general nuts and bolts were all saved for later, delegated to a programmer underling, and framed as details that were definitely less relevant. In the development of this app, the important thing was the project manager, who he talked to, and when he talked to them. The development of the app was a distant second.

My reaction to this, as I jogged, was sad familiarity. I didn’t think, “how dare that project manager steal the show!” I thought, “oh, naturally, that’s a project manager stealing the show – that’s more or less their job. Developer code, not know talk human. Project manager harness, make use developer, real brains operation!”

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Are Your Meetings Worth Attending?

“Remember, kids, your projects are due a week from Monday, so you’d better get started if you haven’t already.”

This imminently relatable phrase, or one like it, is probably the first exposure to nagging that most of us had outside of the home. Oh sure, Mom and Dad had nagged us for years to clean our rooms, say please and thank you, and wear jackets. But our teachers introduced us to business nagging. I’m using the term “business nagging” to characterize the general practice of nudging people to do things for common professional effort.

CodeReview

If you fast forward to your adult life, business nagging morphs into things like, “don’t forget to sign off on your hours in payroll,” and, “everyone must update their email signatures to use the company’s official font by next week.” The subject matter becomes more adult in nature, but the tone and implications do not. When you hear these phrases, you’re transported back in time to junior high, when you needed to rely on a teacher to help prevent your general incompetence at life from creating unfavorable situations for yourself.

There’s a subtle problem with business nagging growing up alongside of us. As children, we actually are pretty incompetent at looking out for own interests. Left to our own devices, we’ll procrastinate on the school project and then pull an all-nighter ahead of turning in something that earns us a C minus. But as we grow to adulthood, we learn these lessons firsthand and wind up being generally decent at looking out for ourselves. We tend not to need nagging nearly as often to do things that will benefit us, so being nagged to do things that will benefit us winds up becoming largely superfluous.

And that leaves the most common form of business nagging: being nagged to do things that offer no obvious benefit to the recipient of the nagging. Signing off on your hours in payroll doesn’t benefit you directly (except, perhaps, by removing the artificial threat not to compensate you for the work you’ve done). Changing your email signature doesn’t benefit you directly. According to someone with some degree of power somewhere in the organization, you doing these things will benefit the company. Presumably, if the company benefits, so do you, somehow. But there is as much vagueness in that equation as there are “somes” in the previous sentence. From where you’re sitting, it’s just bureaucratic procedure having only one tangible benefit—getting the administrator of the business nagging to go away and leave you alone.

This was a post I originally wrote for Infragistics. Click here to read the rest.

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Appeasers, Crusaders, and Why Meetings Usually Suck

I think this is about to get weird, but bear with me, if you’re so inclined.  This is going to be another one of those posts in which I try to explain myself by way of a vague apology for my abnormality.  But maybe if enough of you are similarly abnormal, it’ll gain a little steam.  I’d like to talk today about my odd, intuitive approach to disagreements over the rightness of opinions or beliefs. (For epistemological purposes, consider anything that you’d think of as a “fact” to fall into the belief category.)

So, let’s say that Alice and Bob are sitting on a bench, and Alice proclaims that blue is the best color.  Bob might agree that Alice is right.  He might disagree with her on the basis that red is actually the best color, or he might disagree with her on the basis that this is a purely subjective consideration, so the idea of a “best” color is absurd.  In short, Bob thinks that Alice is wrong.

Perception of rightness affects different people differently, it appears to me.  There are a lot of people out there for whom rightness is extremely important, and the idea that someone might be wrong and not corrected offends them deeply (as shown here, ably, by xkcd).  I am not one of those people.  I might be baited into the occasional back and forth online (or in any asynchronous form) when someone directly accuses me of wrongness, but that’s pretty much it.  I almost never seek out people to correct general wrongness, and I certainly don’t do it in person — with the exception of very close friends and family, and only then in casual conversation.  By and large, other people being wrong about things doesn’t matter to me.  If I’m sitting in the bar, having a beer, and some drunk is yammering political opinions that get increasingly moronic with each boilermaker, I have an innate gift for quietly enjoying the free spectacle.

But there are situations that require cooperation, often professional ones.  Working with another person, there may be some debate or disagreement over the course of action that ought to be taken, and, in such cases, the moment happens when I’m convinced that someone is wrong, and they’re equally convinced that I’m wrong.  The first thing that I do is evaluate whether or not the wrongness negatively impacts me.  If not…meh, whatever. Read More

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8 Career Tips That Don’t Require Competence

A few weeks ago, I posted my spin on the MacLeod Hierarchy and promised to follow up with a post addressing the kind of vacuous, non-strategic career advice that is often given in Buzzfeed sorts of formats.  I started, then, to type this post, but realized that a bridge of sorts was needed.  So I indulged a digression wherein I described the corporate idealist that typically solicits and follows this sort of advice.  (That post also became pretty popular, with a number of requests to pre-order my upcoming book, which you can now check out here on leanpub).  Now, having described the corporate idealist and his willingness to overwork in exchange for useless status tokens, I can go on to be clearer about why so much of the career advice that you tend to hear is so, well, frankly, dumb.

I started to write this just from anecdotal experience, including various comical, ham-fisted self promotion attempts that I’ve watched over the years.  But then I thought it’d make more sense to go out, do some research, and synthesize my experience with actual advice offered in these “Linkbait for Idealist” articles.  This is a list of the ones that I read as reference material.  (As an aside, I also stumbled across a few that offered fairly sensible, decent advice for how to advance meaningfully, so it is actually possible to find advice that isn’t silly)

KingOfSmallKingdom

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Clean Communication

Do you remember your early days of software development in a team setting? If you do, and you’re anything like me, you’ll have awkward memories of trying too hard. Eager to show that you were ready for a seat at the big kids’ table, you’d dive into new assignments with the sort of over-eager attitude that made the grizzled veterans around you roll their eyes knowingly and, perhaps, smile faintly indulgent smiles.

It was time for you to shine. Adding a new radio button option to an existing series of options was the perfect chance for you to show that you knew what the Composite Pattern was. And, why use any of the collection types in the standard library when you could roll your own and use a method header comment to prove, mathematically, that it sorted itself in O(n log n)? Any unimaginative clod could write code that did what the users needed it to do, but it took a visionary, like you or me from days past, to write code that mostly did what users needed it to do while showcasing lessons from all 4 years of your undergraduate programs. Each feature that you delivered was a chance to add to your own personal portfolio at the company.

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