DaedTech

Stories about Software

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Two Flavors of Technical Opportunists: Missionaries and Mercenaries

“Missionaries and mercenaries” has a pretty intriguing ring to it, huh?  I wish I could claim credit for it, but I heard about it on this podcast with Ribbonfarm creator Venkat Rao.  Apparently, entrepreneurs use this pithy phrase to make a distinction among themselves.  I’ll explain in more detail shortly.

First, however, I’d like to do a bit of explanatory housekeeping.  In the coming months, I’m going to make some changes to my life.  Specifically, I plan to wind down the management consulting in favor of creating content (products) and offering productized-services.  This may sound a little crazy to you.  It would have sounded crazy (or naive) to me up until a few years ago.  Why trade a high profile consulting career for… an unknown?  So I want to explain myself before I lose sight of the fact that I might need to explain that to people.

On “Trading Hours for Dollars”

I’ll tell a quick story to clarify.  A few years back, I’d decided to leave a CIO position in favor of consulting as a free agent (which may also sound crazy, but it worked out).  As I looked to build my book of business, I was chatting with fellow Pluralsight author John Sonmez about the jump he had made away from full time employment.  He said something during that conversation that I’ll never forget, when I asked him about how he finds consulting work.

“To be honest, I’m trying to get away from trading hours for dollars.”

When you listen to the podcasts I listen to, read the books I read, and talk to the people I talk to, you’ll hear this a lot.  At the time, however, I had never heard anyone say that.  I probably replied with something noncommittal like, “oh, that’s awesome, man.”  Meanwhile, I recall thinking to myself, “I don’t even… wat?”

These days, I completely get it.  Back then, I didn’t.  And so I want to start bridging the gap before the curse of knowledge consumes me and I just assume that everyone shares my perspective on hourly work and the corporate condition.

Developer Hegemony launches on May 2nd, and people have been asking me what comes next.  Well, among other things, I plan to pursue a line of business wherein I help support people executing their plan to achieve developer hegemony.  But before I can do that, I have some mental groundwork to lay.  And that brings me back to missionaries and mercenaries.

Opportunist Escapees

If you’ve only recently come to read my blog, understand that I mean something deeper than the dictionary definition when I talk about “opportunists.”  I explain in depth in this post, but this graphic should suffice.

Most simply, opportunists are those who maneuver their way to the top of the pyramid-shaped corporations.  The C-suite consists exclusively of these folks, but you’ll also find them at all levels of the organization.  I think of those working their way up as “ascendant opportunists.”

But wherever you find them in the corporate hierarchy at the moment, you’ll find that all of them have ceded good faith with the organization.  In other words, opportunists ascend rapidly by coming to understand the essential bankruptcy of the corporate advancement narrative.  They arrive at their positions and status through the lonely recognition that the normal corporate rules are for the idealists and pragmatists around them.  They chuckle internally, behind a careful poker face, at the notion that companies can have such things as “missions” and “values.”

If you really want to dive deep into the psyche of the opportunist, my book talks about this archetype and the other players in detail.  For our purposes here, I want to talk about what happens to these players when they exit the game.  (And make no mistake, they’re the only ones who ever do this side of retirement.)  What fates await opportunists that exit pyramid-shaped corporate life?

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Expert Beginners Rendered Obsolete

I got an awesome tweet at the Expert Beginner twitter account the other day.  Omer had one of those “wow, I can’t believe I never thought of this myself” ideas.

Yes, please.  Up until this point, I have run this account as a solo effort.  But I certainly have no exclusive claim to some of the world’s worst wisdom delivered with some of the world’s most confidence.

So I am now accepting submissions via twitter DM.  Please send them my way, and I will curate, catalog and queue.  As my work becomes increasingly remote and reclusive, I need all the fodder I can get for the account.

Speaking of Expert Beginners

In case you followed this blog only recently, I’m talking about a phenomenon that started with this post.  You know that one job you had once?  It lasted a year and a half, but seemed like 12.  It dragged because of the senior principal architect on the project.  Courtesy of random name generator, we’ll call him Dale.

Dale eschewed popular frameworks because he once wrote this combination ORM-MVC platform back in 2004 and, in his mind, it’s still chugging along nicely.  This framework set the world record for depth of inheritance hierarchy at 124, per your last count.  Every time you wanted to add a column to some table in a CRUD app, Dale would have to come over and perform open heart surgery at your desk while you tried to read XKCD on your phone without his notice.  But should you ever go off on your own and download something like an actual ORM, Dale would go completely nuclear.

In Dale, we have a classic Expert Beginner.  You put up with him for as long as you could before moving on to greener pastures, but you’re pretty sure he’s still there, jamming his tortured framework into some already-doomed CRUD app.

Dale will tell you what’s wrong with so-called professional ORMs.

Anyway, as I decided to throw the satirical account open to public suggestions, I began to contemplate this older concept of mine against the backdrop of some newer ones.  (Can you believe this dude is 5 years old, already?)

Expert Beginners and Developer Hegemony

Specifically, I started to think about how the relatively simple profile of the Expert Beginner has aged.  In the years between his birth on my blog and the recent completion of my book, Developer Hegemony, I’ve spent a lot of time and mileage consulting.  In particular, I have done a good bit of training and management consulting following a stint as a technical executive.  This has furnished me with the office politics equivalent of language immersion.

I began to wonder about the fate of the expert beginner in the world of developer hegemony that I foresee.  I mention him some in the book, kind of in passing.  But what will actually come of him?

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Developer Hegemony: It’s a Wrap (And Check out the Covers)!

I think I started the initial writing of this book in the summer of 2015.  Then I spent the next year and a half or so writing it in my relatively limited spare time.

Some of this happened piled on top of 50+ hour weeks, by the fluorescent glow of a hotel room light.   Other times it was weekends at home.  But, wherever I found the time, I did my best to keep trucking.  I had a lot of fun doing it, but I have to say it proved a monumental undertaking.

A couple of weeks ago, I completed the initial draft of the book.  Just last night, I published the last significant draft (editing of the last quarter of the book still pending) to Leanpub.  Any subsequent publishes will come as a result of edits and not additions.  So, that’s it.

Thanks to all of the people that have purchased the book or have followed along as I’ve written it!

What Now?

Now, we enter the planning stage, in preparation for a real, no-foolin’ book launch.  We have yet to pick a date yet, but it looks like probably sometime in April.  Still a lot of work to do.

A few quick bullets to note.

  • The book now has a page on my site, here.  I’ll update this as I go, but this represents the ‘official’ Developer Hegemony site.  Look, developerhegemony.com links there, too!
  • I have likewise created a landing page to visit after reading the book.  Around the same time that I launch the book, I’m planning to shift my professional focus to move away from time for money consulting and toward content and productized services.  As part of this, I plan to start offering material on how to hack your corporate career, engineer a safe escape, and move toward more autonomy in life.  That call to action page for after reading will evolve to reflect my progress.
  • I have created a Facebook group for anyone willing to participate in the launch.  If you want to help, I would be much obliged!  Helping should prove pretty easy.  I’m looking for people, on launch day, to either purchase the book, leave me an Amazon review, or just spread the word via social media.  I’m already grateful for your visits to the site and reading of the blog, so no pressure at all.
  • If you want to see updates on the launch, I’ll probably keep you informed on my blog, but signing up for my mailing list or the Facebook group will ensure you receive updates when it goes live.
  • And one last thing.  I need your help picking a cover — please participate!

The Candidate Covers

One Last Thing

Oh, and if you want a sample of the book, you can do it by signing up for the mailing list using the form here.

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