DaedTech

Stories about Software

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The Business-Personal Value Continuum

While out on a jog recently, I found myself listening to an episode of .NET Rocks, in which the discussion covered the surprising percentage of developers still using Winforms and the general topic of using licensed controls written by third parties.  This started a train of thought in my head that might end in mild controversy, but I think it’s worth exploring a bit.

Two profiles (well, more like caricatures) of developer came to mind, standing in stark contrast to one another.  First is this Winforms developer that is more or less cobbling together spare parts to build applications. He uses a WYSIWYG editor, employs some kind of “database form wizard” to bind a GUI widget directly to a table, plops a slew of obscure third party controls into the code, and ships some kind of Franken-app not actually involving much code.  The second profile rounds out the dichotomy and consists of the foundational crafter.  This person builds her own tools and controls using low level language constructs and the command line, and assembles these works of art into ever-higher layers of abstraction until shipping a hand-crafted app.

If I’m running a business, give me the first person.

Undoubtedly, the crafter harbors a better, more fundamental grasp of the principles of computer science, and she undoubtedly offers the most versatility.  If she can build a compiler, use that to build a text editor, use that to build a source control system, use that to build a web server, and use that to build the sexiest, popping-ist, UX-friendliest website you’ve ever seen, she is the most employable, most full stackable programmer ever.  The business will never encounter a situation beyond her grasp.  But who cares, if the business just needs a checkbox added to a battleship gray, outdated Windows application?

Female Artist

I practice test driven development.  I rail against the evils of copy and paste programming.  I counsel clients on the dangers of technical debt and feature slow down.  I advocate wholesale for clean code.  And because of all these things, I understand that every single line of code you write is an incremental business liability.  So why would I take the cobbler over the crafter?  Don’t get me wrong — if I had to pick one of the two of them to write a given module, I would take the crafter.  But for approach, I would take the cobbler because the cobbler makes most of the code someone else’s problem while the crafter makes it all my problem.

What I really want is someone with the chops of a crafter and the reluctance to write more code than necessary of a cobbler.

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Sources of Inspiration

A while back, I got a reader question that was extremely short and sweet.  It was, in essence, asking me about success that I’ve enjoyed.  Given that this is a subjective concern and that I wince at the prospect of self promotion (I’ve learned this is probably a matter of being an introvert), I’d rather deflect this and talk about things that have inspired me over the last number of years.  This post is about those sources of inspiration.

First, though, the reader question.

How did you get to where you are?

To answer that properly would require a good bit of introspection of the form, “where, exactly, do I think that I am.”  I’m not really prepared for that, not because I don’t like introspection, but because I’m pretty content with my life in these terms at the moment.  My life suits me well, but I wouldn’t presume to suggest that it suits others well.  This presents me with the challenge of answering the question, but without the typical, self-help template of “here’s what I did as a blueprint, and you can do it too!”

I think what would go better than that is to talk about some serious sources of inspiration over the last several years.  That way, rather than focusing on what particular things I’ve done, I can focus instead on what I’ve been trying to do and why.  This, I feel, will leave you in a better position to evaluate whether you want to understand “where” I am and whether you also want to be there.

For you mythology buffs, this is Sysiphus actually making it to the top of the hill.

In terms of format, I’m going to talk about four books that have helped me formulate and refine my more recent approach to life.  Using a good bit of wisdom from these books, I’ve gone from working as a software engineer to being an independent technologist.  My work is asynchronous, entirely remote (with some travel), and generally varied in nature.  This makes for a fun mix and it lets me live a pretty low key, mobile life.  All of this is no accident.

So, without further ado, here are the books that have contributed significantly to inspiring my choices.  I’ll describe them briefly, and then the impact they had upon my life.  Keep in mind that these are not in chronological order of my reading of them, but rather in the order I think makes sense to introduce them if you’re looking to pursue a similar path to mine.

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How Do I Find Good Recruiters?

I’ve fallen off my cadence with answering reader questions of late, so I’d like to correct that today.  The question in question is a fairly straight forward one about how to find good recruiters.  This one is actually lifted from a comment some time back that I thought would be more conducive to a post than a comment response.

I would like to ask you how you get to “good” recruiters? My experience with recruiters has been rather negative and I’m wondering if I’m doing something wrong here.

First of all, it’s had to imagine that you’re doing anything wrong.  From the perspective of the job seeker, this is not a difficult transaction.  It’s a lot more likely that the problem lies with the recruiting field in general.

What Makes Them Good?

I’ve had a lot of experience with recruiters, both on the hiring and applicant ends — enough to know well how the game works.  I’ve explained this before, about a year ago.  Short form version is that the typical recruiting firm will take nothing from the applicant, but will take 15 – 20 percent of the first year’s salary from the company that makes the hire.  This cut will be refundable if the applicant leaves within something like six months.  The recruiter’s game is thus to make a match and hope it sticks for 6 months.

Amway

Recruiters’ customers are thus hiring companies, and not you.  It’s like Facebook — you’re the product, not the customer.  The majority of recruiters are in the business of selling humans (that happens to be developers) to companies.  The good recruiters are in the business of selling a match to both the human and the company, since this is the best way to build reputation and avoid the six month refund blues.

But most recruiters are not good — they’re shooting for quantity over quality by treating you as the product.

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How to Get a Raise

I’ve been slipping a little in my quest to answer reader questions of late, so I thought I’d course correct.  The question revolved around the notion of how to get a raise.  Actually, that was the question in its entirety.

How do I get a raise?

A deceptively simple question that one.  So much so, in fact, that I’m going to be kind of roundabout in my response.

Paying the Iron Price for Cable

Assuming that you’re one of the millions of people that pay for cable television, you fork over your $100 per month and get the full rainbow of channels.  You probably don’t think a whole lot about the $100 that you’re spending each month because it’s the closest a recurring cost can come to being a sunk cost.  You’re used to cable and you’re used to your wallet being $100 lighter, so continuing to have cable for $100 per month is not a decision that you consciously make.  In fact, to do something different would be the conscious decision.

Bearing this in mind, do you ever think to yourself, “you know, I love how they’ve finally stopped killing off erstwhile protagonists on Game of Thrones, so I think I’ll call the cable company up and offer to pay $103 per month, starting in the next fiscal year?”  Of course you don’t — that’s ridiculous.

But, let’s consider a slightly modified version of that scenario.  Let’s say that the cable company called you and said, “we’re raising the price of your Premium Thingamajig Package to $103 a month, so if you want to continue to see what Sansa, Arya and the gang are up to, you’re going to have to pay up.”  You probably go on to Facebook, post a cathartic rant, and then pay the extra money.  Because, while that’s inconvenient, what would be more inconvenient is to have to spend time figuring out how to compensate and vary your routine.  You could go with Dish or AT&T or whatever, but that’s probably too much effort to expend over a 3% increase.  If it were a 10% or 15% increase, on the other hand, it might be time to comparison shop.

ArmchairQuarterback

Employment as a Zero Sum Game

As you’ve no doubt surmised, I offered this silly parallel to help you empathize with your employer’s position.  You’re the cable company in their lives — non-critical, largely taken for granted, and prominent enough to be missed as long as the price isn’t too high.  And, like your relationship with your cable company, your relationship with your employer is, talk of family and work-life balance notwithstanding, a zero sum game.  The more money you have, the less they have, and vice-versa.

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Hiring is Broken… And It Isn’t Worth Fixing

Usually I fly home from client sites late in the day, but the whims of fate had me driving home instead, early (for me, anyway) this morning.  The end result was a pocket of uncommon free time this evening, before resuming long days and seemingly non-stop travel on the morrow.  Naturally, I wasted this free time poking around the internet.

My travels led me, via Twitter, to this blog post entitled, “F*** You, I Quit — Hiring Is Broken.”  Apparently, this led to some heated, sometimes-angsty debate on Hacker News, where the original piece earned a good number of points.  And, why wouldn’t it?  “Hiring is broken” would serve as a rallying cry for those who don’t play the interview game well, while seeming a shot across the bow of those who do and are now on the other side of it.

Read the article, please.  You need to for context, because when I reference it further, it’ll just be a reductionist tl;dr.  I’ll come back to that.  First, I’d like to address one of the few points that almost everyone seems to agree on, before they get down to armchair dissection of Sahat’s character and market worth.

The hiring process is imperfect deeply flawed (if not broken), but no one knows how to fix it.

Except, that’s not actually true, because I know how to fix the interview/hiring process.  It’s actually pretty easy.  Just stop doing it.  If the value proposition you’re offering to prospective laborers is so weak that you have to solicit and subsequently torture strangers, you should prioritize fixing your organizational mess above making the mess larger (or, in the case of attrition, before doing the same thing again).

TriviaInterview

I’m honestly not kidding, but let me come back to the mindless growth point later.

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