DaedTech

Stories about Software

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Turning Tech Hobbies into Side Hustle

I just dug up a tweet I made about 4 years ago.  I did this because I remembered saying it, and because it perfectly illustrates a distinction I’m going to make today.  Specifically, I’ll talk about the distinction between technical hobbies and side hustle.  And, I’ll then advocate for side hustle.  But first, the tweet.

Quick and to the point.  The year was 2013, and, during the course of yet another oppressive Chicago winter, I wanted to learn F#.  At the time, I ran an IT department as the CIO for a company, and I had come to miss writing code.  So, I took to Twitter and threatened to teach myself yet another programming language.

I’m embarrassed about this tweet, in a sense.  You might think the fact that I never wound up learning F# embarrasses me.  But no, I’ll get over that.  Rather, the undirected, goalless nature of the sentiment embarrasses me.  It does in the context of career, anyway.

Programming Hobbies

Before I go any further, I want to talk about the idea of hobbies and career.  At times, I’ve enjoyed hobbies, such as guitar playing, cooking, and home improvement, among others.  Given that I’ve historically earned my living in software development, nobody would confuse these hobbies with career plays.

The line blurs a bit with certain other considerations, however.  For instance, I could have regarded writing as a hobby for a good bit of my career.  These days, however, people explicitly pay me to write in various capacities.  This kind of knocks writing out of the realm of pure hobby for me.  And then there’s time you spend outside of work doing what you do for a living.  Let’s say, going home to learn F#.  It doesn’t pay your bills, but you can file it under the heading of “sharpening the saw.”  Sure, my job may not call for F#, but it makes me a better programmer (and, a better CIO, I guess).  So it counts as career-something.  Right?

Actually, I would now argue that no, it does not.  Had I gone home to learn F#, for the sake of learning F#, I would have engaged in a hobby rather than a career play.  You can’t just blindly count something tangentially related to stuff you do for a wage as career improvement.  And yet, we do that.  A lot.

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Two Flavors of Technical Opportunists: Missionaries and Mercenaries

“Missionaries and mercenaries” has a pretty intriguing ring to it, huh?  I wish I could claim credit for it, but I heard about it on this podcast with Ribbonfarm creator Venkat Rao.  Apparently, entrepreneurs use this pithy phrase to make a distinction among themselves.  I’ll explain in more detail shortly.

First, however, I’d like to do a bit of explanatory housekeeping.  In the coming months, I’m going to make some changes to my life.  Specifically, I plan to wind down the management consulting in favor of creating content (products) and offering productized-services.  This may sound a little crazy to you.  It would have sounded crazy (or naive) to me up until a few years ago.  Why trade a high profile consulting career for… an unknown?  So I want to explain myself before I lose sight of the fact that I might need to explain that to people.

On “Trading Hours for Dollars”

I’ll tell a quick story to clarify.  A few years back, I’d decided to leave a CIO position in favor of consulting as a free agent (which may also sound crazy, but it worked out).  As I looked to build my book of business, I was chatting with fellow Pluralsight author John Sonmez about the jump he had made away from full time employment.  He said something during that conversation that I’ll never forget, when I asked him about how he finds consulting work.

“To be honest, I’m trying to get away from trading hours for dollars.”

When you listen to the podcasts I listen to, read the books I read, and talk to the people I talk to, you’ll hear this a lot.  At the time, however, I had never heard anyone say that.  I probably replied with something noncommittal like, “oh, that’s awesome, man.”  Meanwhile, I recall thinking to myself, “I don’t even… wat?”

These days, I completely get it.  Back then, I didn’t.  And so I want to start bridging the gap before the curse of knowledge consumes me and I just assume that everyone shares my perspective on hourly work and the corporate condition.

Developer Hegemony launches on May 2nd, and people have been asking me what comes next.  Well, among other things, I plan to pursue a line of business wherein I help support people executing their plan to achieve developer hegemony.  But before I can do that, I have some mental groundwork to lay.  And that brings me back to missionaries and mercenaries.

Opportunist Escapees

If you’ve only recently come to read my blog, understand that I mean something deeper than the dictionary definition when I talk about “opportunists.”  I explain in depth in this post, but this graphic should suffice.

Most simply, opportunists are those who maneuver their way to the top of the pyramid-shaped corporations.  The C-suite consists exclusively of these folks, but you’ll also find them at all levels of the organization.  I think of those working their way up as “ascendant opportunists.”

But wherever you find them in the corporate hierarchy at the moment, you’ll find that all of them have ceded good faith with the organization.  In other words, opportunists ascend rapidly by coming to understand the essential bankruptcy of the corporate advancement narrative.  They arrive at their positions and status through the lonely recognition that the normal corporate rules are for the idealists and pragmatists around them.  They chuckle internally, behind a careful poker face, at the notion that companies can have such things as “missions” and “values.”

If you really want to dive deep into the psyche of the opportunist, my book talks about this archetype and the other players in detail.  For our purposes here, I want to talk about what happens to these players when they exit the game.  (And make no mistake, they’re the only ones who ever do this side of retirement.)  What fates await opportunists that exit pyramid-shaped corporate life?

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The Whiteboard Interview: Adulthood Deferred

I haven’t traveled this week (at least, not for work).  As a result of that, I’ve sat at home, where I tend to have somewhat higher social media consumption.  I therefore couldn’t help but see this post about “confessing coding sins.”

Twitter has, apparently, overflowed with established software developers ‘confessing’ that they would fail Gigantech Inc’s whiteboard/trivia interviews.  I’d like to go on record to point out that I ranted about the foolishness of this practice long before DHH made doing so cool with this tweet.

Here we have legendary techie David Heinemeier Hansson confessing that the Silicon Valley Gigantechs of the world would fail him out of their phone screens.  His tweet offers a compelling symmetry.  After all, when a cranky Thomas Edison invented the ineffective fad known as the “job interview” (that we haven’t bothered to revisit in the last 100 years), his interview would have failed Albert Einstein.

So, when it comes to the humble job interview, we at least know that it’s consistent.  It fails at its only job just as miserably today as it did in the beginning.  All of the MegaTechs out there in The Valley (and emulators around the world) would have passed on hiring meteoric value-creator DHH, thus calling into question the ubiquitous and vacuous claim of every company out there that “we only hire the best and brightest.”

But let’s come back to DHH a little later.  First, to celebrate the coming spring, I want to talk about baseball.

Wins Above Replacement (WAR)

Even if you don’t enjoy the sport of baseball, you should at least appreciate it for its data.  Unlike many sports out there, baseball happens transactionally.  The pitcher throws a pitch, and then a bunch of easily recorded stuff happens before play stops and this all starts over.  Oh, and we’ve kept logs of this going back 150 years or so.  This property has given rise to an entire discipline of statistics called sabermetrics.  So even if you don’t like home runs and hot dogs, you can at least appreciate the Big Data.

Baseball has a fascinating stat known by industry nerds as “Wins above Replacement (WAR).”  I’ll quote them directly on the meaning.

WAR offers an estimate to answer the question, “If this player got injured and their team had to replace them with a freely available minor leaguer or a AAAA player from their bench, how much value would the team be losing?”

Let me parse out the baseball jargon and simplify.  It asks, “how much value (in wins) does this player provide compared to an unremarkable replacement?”  Modern baseball clubs wager hundreds of millions of dollars answering this question.  A player with WAR above 5 commands that kind of money whereas one with a negative WAR gets a pat on the butt and an imminently unremarkable minor league contract.

WAR ain’t perfect.  But it pretty reasonably approximates player financial value.

What does any of this have to do with the job interview or whiteboard coding algorithms?  Well, the job interview represents the business world’s ludicrous attempt to calculate VAR (value above replacement) of prospective hires.

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Habits that Pay Off for Programmers

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the LogEntries blog.

I would like to clarify something immediately with this post.  Its title does not contain the number 7, nor does it talk about effectiveness.  That was intentional.  I have no interest in trying to piggy-back on Stephen Covey’s book title to earn clicks, which would make this post a dime a dozen.

In fact, a google search of “good habits for programmers” yields just such an appropriation, and it also yields exactly the sorts of articles and posts that you might expect.  They have some number and they talk about what makes programmers good at programming.

But I’d like to focus on a slightly different angle today.  Rather than talk about what makes people better at programming, I’d like to talk about what makes programmers more marketable.  When I say, “habits that pay off,” I mean it literally.

Don’t get me wrong.  Becoming better at programming will certainly correlate with making more money as a programmer.  But this improvement can eventually suffer from diminishing marginal returns.  I’m talking today about practices that will yield the most bang for the buck when it comes time to ask for a raise or seek a new gig.

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The Pyramid Corporation: Your Grade School Teacher for Adults

I can now proudly say that I have finished the initial draft of Developer Hegemony.  Currently, it weighs in at a robust 376 pages that contain my blood, sweat, and tears.  Digitally speaking, anyway.

I haven’t yet published the preview of it because I want to give the people I interviewed a chance to peruse the draft before I make their words available.  But I promise that you’ll have a chance to read in its entirety soon.  I have a lot more coming on that front as well, including the announcement of a launch date, so stay tuned.

I mention completing the book because this should leave me with more time and material to post here on DaedTech.  I’ve mostly cross posted from the other blogs I write for of late, but look for an uptick in posts here.  Alongside that change, I’m going to be shuffling some other things around in my life as well, and changing my focus somewhat in the coming months.  I’ll get to all of this later, but for now, suffice it to say that I plan to post more about the suboptimal current state of the corporate entity and what I believe we can do about it.

And, I’ll start that tonight, with a theme that I wanted to address but didn’t fit particularly well in the book itself.  I’m talking about all of the ways that the corporation has come to simulate a sort of parental/teacher hybrid for adults.

Caveats

Before I go too far, I want to say that I’m not intending to serve up a blistering critique of society, per se.  I feel more philosophical and observational about this.  In other words, think less “this is all so stupid and people are sheep” and more “how and why did we get to this place?”

I understand the how, to some degree.  I think, anyway.  Pyramid shaped corporations (the standard corporate structure) have a knack for becoming less than the sum of their parts.  You can get buy with common sense up to a certain level of scale, and then finally you get some weirdo that likes to clip his fingernails next to the coffee machine no matter how much anyone asks him not to.  Then, bam.  You’ve got a sign next to your coffee machine exhorting people not to clip their fingernails, and your whole company looks ridiculous.

I think that organizational childishness tends to scale more than linearly with the average marginal childishness of individuals hired.  The bigger you get, the more your collective adulthood escapes.  Still, though, it’s amazing we don’t blink more often and scratch our head at the state of things.

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