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Defining Developer Collaboration

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the SmartBear blog.  Check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, take a look around at the pieces written by other authors as well.

A certain ideal of rugged individualism has always permeated programmer culture, at least in some circles. It’s easy enough for writing code to be a highly solitary activity. There’s a clear set of rules, output is a function of input, feedback is automated, and the profession tends to attract night owl introverts in many cases.

The result is a history punctuated by tales of late night, solo efforts where someone stares at a computer until overcome by sleep. Obsessed, brilliant hackers expend inconceivable efforts to bring amazing open source tools or useful libraries into existence. It squares with movies, popular culture, and our own knowledge of our profession’s history.

SuperFastTyping

And yet, how many significant pieces of software are developed this way anymore? This ideal was born into a world where complex software might have required 10 thousand lines of code, but does it carry forward in a world where 10 million lines are common? Even projects started by individuals on a mission tend to wind up on Github and to gather contributors like a snowball rolling down a mountain.

Today’s technical landscape is a highly complex, highly specialized, and highly social one. In a world where heroic individual contributions are increasingly improbable, collaboration becomes the name of the game. Like it or not, you need other people to get much done because the work and the breadth of knowledge tends to be too much for any one person.

Defining Collaboration for Developers

I’ll spare you the obligatory, “Webster’s Dictionary defines collaboration as…” It means what you think it means: people working together. I’d like, instead, to establish some axiomatic ground rules in applying the term to the world of software development.

The first requirement is, of course, that you need to have more than one human being involved to consider the effort to be collaboration. The mechanisms, protocols and roles can vary widely, but table stakes require more than one person.

The second requirement is that the participants be working toward a shared goal. Without this, a bunch of people in a coffee shop could be said to be ‘collaborating’ simply by virtue of colocation and the occasional, polite interaction. Collaboration requires multiple people and it requires them to be united in purpose for the activity in question.

A final and developer-oriented requirement is that the participants must be working on the same work product (i.e. codebase). Again, consider a counter-example in which iOS and Android developers could be said to be ‘collaborating’ since there are more than one of them and they’re united in the purpose of improving users’ smartphone experience. Their shared purpose has to bring them together to work on the same actual thing.

Really, though, that’s it. More than one person, united in purpose and working on the same thing, are necessarily collaborating. Whether they do it well or not is another matter.

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5 Reasons Architect and Developers Argue

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the NDepend blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, check out NDepend and download a trial.

There’s a cute term for a blog post or article that advertises, in its title, a number of points of interest. For example, “9 Tips for Getting out of Debt,” as a title would quality. This is called a “listicle,” which is a conjoining of list and article into one word (though, for me, this somehow manages to evoke the vague image of someone licking an icicle).

This template is not normally my style, but I thought it might be fun to try it on and see how it goes. The topic about which I’d like to talk today is the various vectors for architect-developer tension and this seems, somehow, uniquely suited to the listicle format.

Where the developer role is pretty standard, the architect role is often vague in its definition and can vary widely from organization to organization. In some shops, the architect is just the longest tenured developer, whereas in others the architect is a specialized role that generates mountains of UML diagrams.

The ambiguity and variance, combined with the fact that architect is nominally ‘above’ developers, creates a breeding ground for interpersonal friction. While not always present, this is a common theme in the industry. So, I’d like to examine 5 reasons for strife between developers and architects.

Spies

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The Biggest Mistake Static Analysis Prevents

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the NDepend blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  Take a look at NDepend while you’re there; if static analysis interests you in the .NET space, it’s a must-try.

As I’ve probably mentioned before, many of my clients pay me to come do assessments of their codebases, application portfolios and software practice.  And, as you can no doubt imagine, some of my sturdiest, trustiest tools in the tool chest for this work are various forms of static analysis.

Sometimes I go to client sites, by plane, train or automobile (okay, never by train).  Sometimes I just remote in.  Sometimes I do fancy write-ups.  Sometimes, I present my findings with spiffy slide decks.  And sometimes, I simply deliver a verbal report without fanfare.  The particulars vary, but what never varies is why I’m there.

Here’s a hint: I’m never there because the client wants to pay my rate to brag about how everything is great with their software.

Smelly computer

Where Does It All Go Wrong?

Given what I’m describing here, one might conclude that I’m some sort of code snob and that I am, at the very least, heavily judging everyone’s code.  And, while I’ll admit that every now and then I think, “the Daily WTF would love this,” mostly I’m not judging at all – just cataloging.  After all, I wasn’t sitting with you during the pre-release death march, nor was I the one thinking, “someone is literally screaming at me, so global variable it is.”

I earnestly tell developers at client sites that I don’t know that I’d have done a lot better walking a mile in their shoes.  What I do know is that I’d have, in my head, a clearer map from “global variable today” to “massive pain tomorrow” and be better able to articulate it to management.  But, on the whole, I’m like a home inspector checking out a home that was rented and subsequently trashed by a rock band; I’m writing up an assessment of the damage and not tsking their lifestyle.

But for my clients, I’m asked to do more than inspect and catalog – I also have to do root cause analysis and offer suggestions.  So, “maybe pass a house rule limiting renters to a single bottle of whiskey per night,” to return to the inspection metaphor.  And cataloging all of these has led me to be a veritable human encyclopedia of preventable software development mistakes.

I was contemplating some of these mistakes recently and asking myself, “which was the biggest one” and “which would have been the most preventable with even simple analysis in place?”  It was interesting to realize, after a while, that the clear answer was not at all what you’d expect.

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What a Software Audit Means for You

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the SmartBear blog.  Check out the original, here, at their site.  While you’re there, have a look around at some of the other authors’ posts.

“We’re being audited.”

Now there’s a sentence to strike fear into anyone’s heart. The most famous and iconic example of an audit is the dreaded IRS audit. This audit is the IRS’s way of saying, “you did something wrong during the course of an extremely byzantine process we force on you, and now we’re going to make your life miserable by going through every inch of your life with a fine-toothed comb.” Or at least, that is the reputation.

irs

Now, while I’m not here to defend the US tax code nor bureaucracy in general, I will say that this is not exactly what the IRS is saying. Rather, they’re saying, “we’ve noticed inconsistencies between what you’ve reported and what we’ve observed elsewhere, and we are going to investigate further.” And, while this investigation does, in fact, mean a lot of unpleasantness for you, that is not the purpose. An audit, per its dictionary definition, is “a methodical examination and review.”

Audits at Your Place of Business

Considered this way, the word loses some of its onerousness, since it is not deliberately punitive. But it’s still not exactly a cause to throw a party – it means that someone is about to come take a very close look at something you’ve done, with exacting rules and detailed expectations. You’re about to be under a microscope.

Having established that an audit is strict and not punitive, what are the implications for you, as a software developer? What does it mean for you code/software to be audited? If your boss or a colleague utters those three fateful words, “we’re being audited,” what does this mean for your organization and for you?

Well, I’m a consultant, so you can probably predict my answer: “it depends.” “We’re being audited” is informative, but it’s not quite enough information. There are, after all, different kinds of audits, conducted for different purposes. Let’s consider a few of them.

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How to Get Developers to Adopt a Coding Standard

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the NDepend blog. Head over to their site and check out the original, here.  While you’re there, have a look around at the other posts; if you enjoy static analysis, you’ll enjoy what’s there.

If you’re a manager, there’s a decent chance that the subject of coding standards makes you want to bang your head against a wall repeatedly.  If you’re a developer, you can probably understand why this is true of your manager, if you think about it.

The group coding standard has the following properties.

  • It’s extremely technical and granular.
  • Developers tend to squabble about it.
  • If it produces any business value, it does so obliquely and theoretically, from management’s perspective.

Thus, if I’m a manager, there’s this inscrutable document out there that causes my team to argue, and whose existence I must take on faith to be a good thing.  As you can see, it doesn’t start out on my good side.

Does It Matter?

There are all manner of opinions and arguments to be found on the internet as to why a coding standard matters (or doesn’t).  I’ve wrote about the subject myself from time to time.  So, without belaboring the point, I’ll make the quick business case for it.

The purpose of a coding standard, at its core, is twofold:

  1. It promotes maintainability by making all code look similar and familiar to all developers.
  2. It standardizes approaches that promote correct code (and avoid incorrect code).

Thus, on the whole, the coding standard makes the total cost of ownership of the codebase decrease by some amount ranging between 0 and “indeterminate.”  As an outside party, you simply have to take on faith that there is an ROI and that the amount of time wasted in arguments, complaining, and compliance is offset by the reduced troubleshooting and onboarding times.

And, in my experience, it generally is.  Notwithstanding pouting and bickering that happens early in the project and makes life unpleasant, it’s better to have these things than not to have them.  The key, then, becomes minimizing the cost of having the standard.  And you do this by securing compliance with the least amount of heartburn for all involved.

So how do you do that?  How do you convince the developers to buy in with a minimum of resistance and friction?

Clipboard

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